Flossing is NOT The Key to Avoiding Cavities and Periodontal Disease – New Simple Home Remedies

Flossing is NOT The Key to Avoiding Cavities and Periodontal Disease – New Simple Home Remedies

  NEW SIMPLE DENTAL PROCEDURES to Limit Cavities You Can Do On Your Own The problem many of us have as we get older is not having enough saliva in our mouth. Saliva is critical to battle plaque and acid in our  preventing bacteria and plague, and thereby more cavities. Many of us eat and drink acidic foods that contribute to the problem. I only learned this well in my sixth decade after having had radiation and lost part of my salivary glands seven implants later. It is important to have enough cavity-fighting saliva   in your mouth at all times. The surfaces of our teeth constantly go through cycles of breakdown and repair. For over a century we have known that sugars and starches in our diets are converted to acids by the bacteria that live in our mouth. This acidic environment (low pH) favors the growth of more acid-producing bacteria. These acids can weaken the teeth. This is called demineralization.  Over time, teeth can become sensitive to cold, to sweets and tooth brushing. If the acid damage continues, the surface of the tooth collapses, and a cavity results.  This damage typically receives traditional surgical repair, such as a filling. Our teeth and saliva have a naturally occurring maintenance system, but the fermentable carbohydrates (sugars) of a typical diet combined with acid-producing oral bacteria overwhelm our mouth’s natural repair capability, and dental decay is often the result. We must RE-MINERALIZE and you can do this, especially with the new, updated knowledge we are hearing about and learning from  dental organiztions like NEW ENAMEL (registerd) Improving your teeth situation can be...
Dry Mouth 12 Step Guide -Symptoms,Causes and Treatment

Dry Mouth 12 Step Guide -Symptoms,Causes and Treatment

    SLIDE 1 / 12  Dry Mouth – Symptoms, Causes  and Treatment Effects of Dry Mouth When your mouth makes little or no saliva, it affects more than just your thirst. Saliva helps you taste and digest what you eat and drink. It flushes food particles from your teeth and reduces the acids that cause tooth decay. Effects of Dry Mouth When your mouth makes little or no saliva, it affects more than just your thirst. Saliva helps you taste and digest what you eat and drink. It flushes food particles from your teeth and reduces the acids that cause tooth decay. Sources Reviewed by Michael Friedman, DDS on November 01, 2015 This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information © 2015 WebMD, LLC. All rights...